Monthly Archives: November 2013

Photo Journalism Friday: The Christ of the Mercy

Photo Journalism Friday: Christ of the Mercy

The Christ of the Mercy statue was erected in 2009 and and has quickly become an ionic landmark and geographical reference point for the town of San Juan del Sur. At 24 meters it is the largest statue of Christ in Central America and one of the 10 largest Jesus statues in the world. El Cristo de la Misericordia was the dream of a local businessman, Erwin Gonzalez, who made his fortune from tourism. 

Mercado Monday: Mamón Chino (Rambutan)

Mercado Monday: Mamón Chino (Rabutan)

Mamón Chino or Rambutan (“rum-boo-tan”)

Buying Guide:
There is no real trick to finding ripe mamón chino. If they are red they are ready to go.

How to Eat It:
Mamón chino is a great fruit to eat on the run. Just pinch or bite a small hole in the skin and peel it away to expose the flesh inside. Then just pop the whole thing into your mouth and chew and suck the flesh off the seed inside.

Flavor:
Mamón chino (also referred to as rambutan) is a cousin to the much more well-known lychee fruit. The two taste very similar. They are sweet and slightly tart, with the consistency of a firm grape. 

Harvesting Season:
Mamón chino can be harvested twice per year, but is most prevalent July through September.

Nutrition:
Mamón chino is low in calories and high in Vitamin C, iron and anti-oxidants.

Interesting Facts:
Mamón chino roughly translated means “Chinese sucker”.  Originating from Indonesia and Malaysia it can be found growing naturally all over Southeast Asia. Most Nicaraguans refer to people of any Asian descent as Chinese.  For example, our good friend Kenny is Hawaiian. Locals refer to him as “chinito” (cute little China man). Thinking in true Nica logic – a fruit of Asian background that you suck on – should obviously be called a  Chinese sucker.

We’ve Got 2 More “Red Hot” Real Estate Deals for You!

We’ve got 2 more red hot real estate deals to share with you. 

 SMALL SCALE TURN KEY RESTAURANT in SAN JUAN DEL SUR
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View these ads (and more value priced properties) on our Hot Deals: Real Estate page!

International Living Article #4

Click anywhere on the image or text below to read my most recent International Living article.

I Couldn't Even ask for a Cerveza

Photo Journalism Friday: The Sound of Nicaragua

Photo Journalism Friday:  The Sound of Nicaragua

Animal-shaped ocarinas (flutes) can be found all over Nicaragua. These little whistles are colorful, detailed and sweet sounding – they also tend to be quite successful in catching tourist’s attention.

El Dia de los Muertos (The Day of the Dead)

Vehicles are parked on both sides of the street as far as I can see. I find a clearing and pull off onto the side of the road to park the truck.

Two young girls walk past hand in hand with their grandma. Each carries a bouquet of bright red flowers. 

As I approach the cemetery I hear music in the distance. Suddenly I’m covered head to toe in goosebumps.

It’s November 1st and hundreds of people are gathered in the cemetery to celebrate El Dia de Los Muertos (The Day of the Dead).

Families have spent the last couple of days cleaning up and decorating the grave sites of their loved ones. They have come together today to honor and celebrate the lives of friends and family members that have passed.

Aside from the tombstones the scene before me mirrors that of a busy park on a sunny Sunday – anywhere in North America. 

Refreshments of all kinds including ice cream, cotton candy and snow cones are available for purchase. Typical Nicaraguan dishes such as vigaron and barbecued chicken are also available. Some families have come prepared toting their own picnic.

Children are playing quietly. Long time neighbors and family friends are enjoying the day together. They share stories of their lost loved ones. Some tales invoke a tear, but most bring laughter, or at least a smile.

A lone chicken crosses my path and a couple of children run by.

I look around taking in this celebration with awe and amazement and I think to myself, “Why don’t we do this in Canada?”

Celebrating Halloween in Nicaragua

Two hundred and forty costume clad kids and their parents celebrated Halloween in San Juan del Sur this year.

Ballerinas, belly dancers, ghosts, goblins, witches and pirates made their way around town collecting candy from local businesses. 

Final destination for these trick or treaters was Crazy Crab Disco. Those who dared – navigated through a haunted house – where our friend Katie played the role of a creepy witch while Gordon acted as Dracula.

The festivities came to a close with cold beverages of choice for the parents and a huge piñata for the kids.

Kudos to Comunidad ConnectSan Juan del Sur Day school and local participating businesses for making this Halloween celebration possible.

Author’s Note: Halloween is not a traditional Nicaraguan holiday. That being said; dressing up in costumes, marching the streets, celebrating children and sharing an abundance of candy resembles many traditional Nicaraguan holidays. It’s not surprising the San Juanistas have embraced Halloween with open arms.

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